Notes on Chris Risdon’s Shaping Behavior, By Design

(From a virtual seminar on uie.com’s All You Can Learn library) “Choice Architecture…is organizing the context in which people make decisions” from Nudge by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein Example of Choice Architecture: A company redesigns their cafeteria to highlight the salad bar and healthy food options, while making the less healthy choices more difficult to see and get. The architecture is attempting to create a more health-conscious cafe layout to get employees to make more healthy choices. No choices were eliminated, some were just emphasized As UXers, our products and services often live in an environment over which we have … Continue reading Notes on Chris Risdon’s Shaping Behavior, By Design

Notes on KISSMetric’s Don’t Do A Redesign! Learn Why Evolution Beats Revolution

From a 03/15 post on KISSMetrics’ blog by Allen Greer, link here. Evolutionary Redesign uses A/B testing to ensure design updates increase conversions and revenue Total redesigns are often driven by the desire to keep up with trends/competitors/egos, or by a faltering core business–not by how actual users feel about the product Some failings of total redesign: Too much, too soon confuses the situation and makes it impossible to know which changes were impactful on user interactions Most designers aren’t UX experts and aren’t trained to consider user feedback an integral part of their process–in fact, the business culture usually … Continue reading Notes on KISSMetric’s Don’t Do A Redesign! Learn Why Evolution Beats Revolution

Notes on Gerry McGovern’s Top Tasks Identification Method Explained

From a 11/12/10 blog post by Gerry McGovern on his site, link here. Gerry posted on the subject again on 5/21/15, link here. Gerry has developed a survey technique for finding top user tasks. Make a list with 100 tasks Ask survey participants to quickly pick their top 5 tasks That’s it! Well, actually, compile results etc… By surveying 400 customers, you will find users’ top 10 tasks with reasonable certainty 400 is a good number since the chances of a top task being in the bottom 50, or of a largely unwanted task being in the top 10, is … Continue reading Notes on Gerry McGovern’s Top Tasks Identification Method Explained

Improve Your UX via Better Front-End Performance

My notes on an article by Etsy’s Lara Swanson posted to A List Apart, Improving UX Through Front-End Performance  Adding a half-second to a search results page can decrease traffic and ad revenue by 20%, according to Google research Amazon’s research indicates that an additional 100 milliseconds of load time decreases sales by 1% Users expect pages to load in 2 seconds; after 3 seconds, 40% of users leave Lara ran a test on Etsy with a new design that took twice as long to load–and she immediately saw a much higher exit rate and lower conversion rate. But it was good … Continue reading Improve Your UX via Better Front-End Performance

How to Validate Your Product Idea with an Initial Quick Experiment

Notes on a blogpost on smashingmagazine.com by Grace Ng, co-founder of Javelin, software for testing the viability of new ideas. Step 1 Design an effective experiment Break down your idea into testable elements. An effective experiment must clearly define: Hypothesis Riskiest assumption Method Minimum criterion for success Lean Startup Machine created a tool for this called Experiment Board which is definitely worth checking out. Step 2 Construct a hypothesis Define your customer—identify which customer segment experiences the most pain and start with them. (Separate your customers into segments with specific differentiating characteristics, such as lifestyle and environmental factors—being very specific here allows you … Continue reading How to Validate Your Product Idea with an Initial Quick Experiment

How TheLadders Used User Validation and Lean Methods to Create Their Mobile iOS App

Notes on Michelle Zassenhaus’ talk at LeanUXResearchapaloozafest held at Spotify on Jan 14, 2014, link here. Michelle is the Director of UX and Design at TheLadders. TheLadders job site needed to develop an iPhone app. What’s an MVP for an app? How do you iterate in a Lean methodology? Some issues that make it unlike website development: Consumers control the updates If consumers don’t like an app the first time they use it, they’ll never try it again 1-star reviews in the App Store would be tough for an MVP to overcome The team wanted to create an MVP app that … Continue reading How TheLadders Used User Validation and Lean Methods to Create Their Mobile iOS App

User Flow and Mobile Devices by Dana Chisnell

Notes from Dana Chisnell‘s Mobile Flowidity presentation on uie.com. Responsive design is a brilliant hack Small devices depend on great user flow to be usable. The flow needs to be planned for all size screens and devices. Obstacles from standard sites can kill a mobile experience: Connectivity–don’t hide important information behind connectivity error screens in apps Authentication–the more characters required, the greater chance users will screw up input On-boarding Security Questions CAPTCHA Updates Alerts–Can cover up interactive elements Location Awareness–don’t pop up Allow message until actually needed Opting In Start-up Instructions–No one reads them. If users can’t figure it out … Continue reading User Flow and Mobile Devices by Dana Chisnell

Notes on “How to Manufacture Desire” by Nir Eyal

From Nir Eyal‘s presentation at the Interaction13 conference in Toronto Jan 2013, video here. (Tip of the hat to @allanberger.) QuickTake Users return habitually to apps via hooks. Hooks are experiences that users find so valuable that they return frequently for more experiences. Hooks have 4 parts: triggers, actions, rewards and investments. How did products like Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare etc blow up so quickly? Why did users adopt their services? How did their services become habits? How can we create sticky experiences? Users return to apps by getting hooked Hooks are experiences designed to connect a solution to the user’s … Continue reading Notes on “How to Manufacture Desire” by Nir Eyal