Notes on Krystal Higgins’ Onboarding for the Long Run

(From uie.com’s All You Can Learn library, link here) Onboarding is too often thought of only from the perspective of a first time user—not taking into account that there’ll be iterations based on user feedback, new features to launch etc Onboarding is an experience throughout a product’s lifecycle So different customers may need different onboarding paths Opportunities over time Onboarding has multiple jobs and stages: Familiarize—help the prospective customer know that the product and its services exist Learn—teach the prospective customer more details about the product’s value prop Convert—engage the prospective customer enough to convert them into actual customers Guide—help the … Continue reading Notes on Krystal Higgins’ Onboarding for the Long Run

Notes on Tom Chi’s Rapid Prototyping and Prod Mgt

(From Tom’s talk at Mind the Product 2015, link here) I highly recommend watching the half-hour video, it’s really enlightening and I wasn’t able to take great notes Here are a few takeaways: Don’t waste time arguing your “gut”—get out there and test! Keep loop length as short as possible for Lean, efficiency reasons: ie, test regularly—perhaps 2x a week, as a non-negotiable calendar entry. Whatever’s ready, test! You’ll be testing again in 2 days As product folks, we are going for the “eyes light up” or “magic moments”—”Wow, the product does that?” Everything else—sign in flow etc—should be subservient … Continue reading Notes on Tom Chi’s Rapid Prototyping and Prod Mgt

Notes on Janna Bastow’s 7 Brilliant Skills to Master as PM

(From Janna Bastow’s 9/5/17 talk at Mind the Product, video link here) Janna has 7 tips to survive the hardest parts of being a PM 1 — Ask the best, open questions you can and prompt people as they respond to go deeper: Go on, what else, what do you really think? 2 — Make your roadmap tell a story Keep your language clean and simple—avoid acronyms, specialized vocab etc so that the entire cross-functional team can understand the map A roadmap should describe where you are, where you are going short term, and where you are headed long term … Continue reading Notes on Janna Bastow’s 7 Brilliant Skills to Master as PM

Notes on Dustin DiTommaso’s Designing Motivational Interventions

What is Behavior Change Design? The study and application of behavioral and social science, motivational psychology and HCI to the design and evaluation of products, services and interventions aimed at changing real world behavior. Whew! Examples: Reduce harmful behaviors—quit smoking, stop taking payday loans etc Increase beneficial behaviors—saving money, getting in shape etc Self-Management of chronic conditions—diabetes and stress mgt etc Increasing pro-social behaviors—hand washing, immunization, recycling etc Behavior Change Design Venn Diagrams: Behavior Change Methodology: Behavior change model:   About Dustin (from his company’s website): Dustin is Senior Vice President of Behavior Change Design at Mad*Pow. A designer and researcher, … Continue reading Notes on Dustin DiTommaso’s Designing Motivational Interventions

Notes on Whitney Quesenbery’s Getting from Barrier-free to Delightful Experiences

(Posted on uie.com’s All You Can Learn section, link here) Whitney defines delight as a balance of small pleasures and consideration—little victories in an impersonal world Mapping expectations and experiences: Accessibility guidelines exist: webaim.org is a site that has resources for testing content for accessibility, though it’s mostly focused on mechanical accessibility and not actual content accessibilit Also check out colorsafe.co to design accessible color palettes Accessibility comes in many forms, from barely acceptable to best practices: (That’s the LA County Elections Dept of universal voting project shown above) Accessibility should be thought of as an extension of UX for … Continue reading Notes on Whitney Quesenbery’s Getting from Barrier-free to Delightful Experiences

Notes on Kim Goodwin’s Preventing the Swoop-and-Poop with Successful Stakeholder Engagement

(From Kim’s 11/16 conference talk at UI21, posted to uie.com’s All You Can Learn section, link here) As UXers, we are often concerned about stakeholder behavior—which we can shape through our behavior towards them and our project We want to maximize our influence on their behavior We need to design our stakeholders’s experience of us: Identify “users” and roles in the project Understand & design for the org’s context and culture Understand & design for them as individuals—where are they in their understanding of design and this project etc 1. Roles Stakeholder Generally not well-defined Person who signs off on Jira stories? Person … Continue reading Notes on Kim Goodwin’s Preventing the Swoop-and-Poop with Successful Stakeholder Engagement

Notes on Alex Osterwalder’s Designing Your Value Proposition

(From Alex’s 2014 talk at Mind the Product, link here) Alex created the Value Proposition Canvas as part of an effort to create a shared language orgs can use to discuss product development Visual tools can help meetings avoid devolving into “blah blah blah” word discussions Looking at a specific audience segment, map out a customer’s profile by detailing tier jobs to be done and their pains and gains How can your product address these issues? Alex developed a visual canvas for capturing this: Add Post-Its to the customer portion of the canvas, then organize them from most to least … Continue reading Notes on Alex Osterwalder’s Designing Your Value Proposition

Notes on Stephen P. Anderson’s Friction, More or Less

(From a 8/24/17 webcast on uie.com’s All You Can Learn section, soon to be posted on their site) Stephen identifies 6 kinds of friction: Bad friction Is negative and noticeable Example: When you click a link on Twitter for a LinkedIn article, and you get a popup making you sign into LinkedIn even though you are already logged into the LinkedIn website Avoid bad friction using user interviews, reviewing server logs/site date, using plain language, sticking with familiar UX patterns etc Unseen friction Is negative, but goes unnoticed until fixed Example: Photographing your credit card and not having to type … Continue reading Notes on Stephen P. Anderson’s Friction, More or Less

Notes on Bruce McCarthy’s Prioritizing Product Goals

(added 12/16 to uie.com’s All You Can Learn video library, link here) Bruce created a matrix of bad ways to rank ideas: He also charted steps to prioritization: A key starting point is figuring out your strategic goal is —i.e. defining desired end goals Needs (output) are different than end goals (outcome): By focusing on outcomes, we can better prioritize our work Barry identifies 10 basic product goals: Don’t work on more than 3 goals at any given time Create a prioritization scorecard Rate goals 0,1,2—with 0 being little effect on the product, 1 being moderate effect, and 2 being large … Continue reading Notes on Bruce McCarthy’s Prioritizing Product Goals

Notes on Dan Brown’s Creating Effective Discovery Documentation

(added 08/17 to uie.com’s All You Can Learn video library, link here) What guides discovery? Curiosity You’re excited to learn new things and this energy enlivens the whole team You always ask more questions Skepticism You don’t accept assertions at face value and instead probe assumptions But you get practical—you illustrate your ideas with pictures/visual artifacts Humility You acknowledge and embrace your lack of knowledge and naivety about the problem You name your limits esp when making assumptions The discovery process Ask questions to begin creating a shared pool of knowledge: Who do we want to reach w our product? How … Continue reading Notes on Dan Brown’s Creating Effective Discovery Documentation